theinnkeeperlibrarian

bobbycaputo:

Yale Project Makes 170,000 Depression-Era Photos Searchable with Interactive Database

Dorothea Lange’s iconic Migrant Mother, pictured above, is just one of the roughly 170,000 photographs taken between 1935 and 1945 for a project commissioned by theUnited State’s Farm Security Administration and Office of War Information (FSA-OWI).

All of those photos are currently being stored in the Library of Congress, but a dedicated team from Yale University is looking to revitalize this invaluable collection of photographs by organizing them, pairing them up, and explaining how these images and photographers came together to create the most comprehensive looks at America following the Great Depression and into the early years of WWII.

The resulting project is called Photogrammar, and it’s one of the most beautiful and comprehensive conglomerations of visuals and information you’re ever likely to stumble across.

Using interactive maps, dashboards and even color wheels, Photogrammar and its accompanying ‘Labs’ projects provide a visual hierarchy of information that brings the almost 80-year-old project back to life.”

awesomearchives

archaeologicalnews:

image

Several thousand manuscripts that are several centuries old are set to be digitized and made available over the Internet in the public domain, thanks to an initiative by the state government of Tamil Nadu in India.

The 72,300 rare and original palm-leaf manuscripts…

booktraces
booktraces:

From submitter Andrew Stauffer:

Traced hands on the rear free end-paper of an 1853 copy of the Works of William Shakespeare, with schoolgirl Miriam Trowbridge’s teasing inscription, “Ruthie Whitehead’s ugly hand – Oh! No, I mean beautiful one –.” The girls seem to have been outlining each other’s hands in their textbook while at Madame Chegary’s fashionable boarding school in New York.

Title: The Works of ShakespeareAuthor: Shakespeare, WilliamPublication date: New York, 1853Library: Alderman Library, University of VirginiaCall number: PR2753 .C75 1853Submitted by: Andrew Stauffer

Ever opened up a library book and found it full of scribbles from a previous reader? While you’d think this practice would be the bane of librarians’ existence, it will certainly make your otherwise run of the mill copy of the Works of William Shakespeare from high school much more interesting 160+ years down the road.
Book Traces is a project seeking to identify and rescue unique copies of otherwise ordinary library books that are in danger of being discarded as libraries move more and more of their holdings to the digital world—go to their website for more information on how to contribute, or follow their Tumblr for more examples of hidden treasures in the margins, front covers, and title pages of old books. 

booktraces:

From submitter Andrew Stauffer:

Traced hands on the rear free end-paper of an 1853 copy of the Works of William Shakespeare, with schoolgirl Miriam Trowbridge’s teasing inscription, “Ruthie Whitehead’s ugly hand – Oh! No, I mean beautiful one –.” The girls seem to have been outlining each other’s hands in their textbook while at Madame Chegary’s fashionable boarding school in New York.

Title: The Works of Shakespeare
Author: Shakespeare, William
Publication date: New York, 1853
Library: Alderman Library, University of Virginia
Call number: PR2753 .C75 1853
Submitted by: Andrew Stauffer

Ever opened up a library book and found it full of scribbles from a previous reader? While you’d think this practice would be the bane of librarians’ existence, it will certainly make your otherwise run of the mill copy of the Works of William Shakespeare from high school much more interesting 160+ years down the road.

Book Traces is a project seeking to identify and rescue unique copies of otherwise ordinary library books that are in danger of being discarded as libraries move more and more of their holdings to the digital world—go to their website for more information on how to contribute, or follow their Tumblr for more examples of hidden treasures in the margins, front covers, and title pages of old books. 

newberryprinting

newberryprinting:

Beautiful type ornaments from A Showing of Cleland Ornaments & Borders from the American Type Founders Company. T.M. Cleland began working with the company in 1917 and designed all of their ornaments and borders, resulting in the popularization of French Renaissance graphics in the first half of the 20th century.

Newberry call number: Wing folio Z250.3 .A64 1920

Gorgeous prints from the Newberry Library’s Hidden Collections project, Printing Specimens (1605-present) at the Newberry Library, funded in 2013. Give them a follow to see a huge variety of prints from the last 400 years as they catalog and process over 29,800 items from the John M. Wing Foundation on the History of Printing.